University of California, Riverside

Eaton Science Fiction Conference



Biographies A to Z


  • Elizabeth Faith Aamot

    Elizabeth Faith Aamot earned her MFA in Creative Writing and Writing for the Performing Arts from the University of California at Riverside in 2005. That year, she won the UC system-wide Poet Laureate Award. She currently teaches English at San Bernardino Valley College and is at work on a novel that layers a first-person narrative of the 50FT Womanwith documentary-style prose pieces speculating on the real-world effects of her existence.

    Session 70: Science Fiction and Social Media

  • Kathryn Allan

    Kathryn Allan completed her PhD (English Literature) from McMaster University in 2010. Her doctoral thesis, Bleeding Chrome: Technology and the Vulnerable Body in Feminist Post-Cyberpunk Science Fiction, is available for free download (as a pdf.) from her blog, Bleeding Chrome. She operates an academic coaching and copy editing business, Academic Editing Canada, as she pursues independent scholarly research into (feminist/cyberpunk) science fiction. Dr. Allan writes for both academic and fan audiences, and is currently putting together an essay collection on the representations of disability in science fiction (out for peer-review in September 2012).

    Session 15: Gods and Monsters in Science Fiction Television

  • Chad Andrews

    Chad Andrews is a PhD student in his fourth year of the Cultural Studies program at Trent University. His primary research is focussed on post-War American popular culture and, more specifically, the politics of the 1980s. In terms of science fiction, his current work aims to position 1980s subgenres as discourses that contributed to the maintenance (in some cases) and critique (in others) of American foreign policy, military adventurism, and unimpeded technological "progress."

    Session 59: Labor and Capital in Science Fiction

  • Daniel Ante-Contreras

    Daniel Ante-Contreras is a second year graduate student in the English department at UCR. His interests include video game studies, queer theory, and Cold War literature and culture.

    Session 32: Queering the Genre

  • Brian Attebery

    Brian Attebery is a past Pilgrim Award winner and editor of the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts and co-editor with Veronica Hollinger of the forthcoming Parabolas of Science Fiction.

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)

  • Stina Attebery

    Stina Attebery is a Ph.D. student in English at UC Riverside, specializing in science fiction and animal studies. She has previously presented at the 2011 Science Fiction Research Association conference in Lublin, Poland and the 2013 International Conference for the Fantastic in the Arts.

    Session 70: Science Fiction and Social Media

  • Jeremiah B.C. Axelrod

    Jeremiah B.C. Axelrod serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor in the History, American Studies, and Urban & Environmental Policy Departments, at Occidental College. He also teaches with that university's Cultural Studies Program. Professor Axelrod is the author of Inventing Autopia: Envisioning the Modern Metropolis in Jazz Age Los Angeles, published by the University of California Press in 2009, as well as several articles. His research generally probes the connections between visuality, urban topography, memory, gender, race, and transportation in twentieth century Southern California. Axelrod is the founding partner in two Internet-based technology start-ups, Music For Dozens and Grabbit, LLC, based in Portland, Oregon.

    Session 16: Mirror, Mirror: Intertextual Narratives of Power and Identity in Science Fiction Television

  • Daoine S. Bachran

    Daoine S. Bachran is a PhD student at the University of New Mexico, focusing her studies on ethnic American literatures. Her dissertation examines science fiction by Natives, Chicanos/as, and Black women writers, artists, and filmmakers.

    Session 52: Ethnicity and Hybridity in Science Fiction

  • Craig Baldwin

    Craig Baldwin is an American experimental filmmaker. He uses "found" footage from the fringes of popular consciousness as well as images from the mass media to undermine and transform the traditional documentary, infusing it with the energy of high-speed montage and a provocative commentary that targets subjects from intellectual property rights to rampant consumerism.

    University of California, Riverside Culver Center Plenary Event

  • Anindita Banerjee

    Anindita Banerjee is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, faculty affiliate in the South Asia Program and Visual Studies, and fellow of the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University. She is particularly interested in how the techno-political imagination intersects with its literary and visual counterparts, and how these intersections negotiate trans-local practices and global understandings of modernity. The subject is explored at length in her recent book, We Modern People: Science Fiction and the Making of Russian Modernity, published by Wesleyan University Press.

    Session 57: Indian Science Fiction

  • Suparno Banerjee

    Suparno Banerjee is an Assistant Professor of English at Texas State University, San Marcos specializing in science fiction and postcolonial studies. He has previously published his scholarship in the United States and India in such scholarly journals as Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts and Apperception and in the recent anthologies on postcolonial science fiction, Science Fiction, Imperialism, and the Third World (2010) and The Postnational Fantasy (2011).

    Session 57: Indian Science Fiction

  • Cate Bangs

    Cate Bangs is an art director and set designer. She has worked on such projects as ABC’s Private Practice and Desperate Housewives, along with NBC’s Journeyman and the CW’s Charmed. Her film credits include, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Volcano, Robin Hood: Men in Tights, and The Seventh Sign.

    Session 69: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Luana Barossi

    Luana Barossi is a PhD candidate at the University of Sao Paulo, in the field of Comparative Studies of Lusophone Literatures. She studies science fictional elements of representation in the Lusophone Narratives, proposing dialogic relations among utopias, dystopias, heterotopias, cyborgs, post-humans and cyberspace, focusing on the tension and the convergence of these with literary criticism, subjectivity, science and culture.

    Session 47: Adaptation, Fandom, and Genre

  • Gregory Benford

    Gregory Benford has published over thirty books, mostly novels. Nearly all remain in print, some after a quarter of a century. His fiction has won many awards, including the Nebula Award for his novel Timescape. A winner of the United Nations Medal for Literature, he is a professor of physics, emeritus, at the University of California, Irvine. He is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, was Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University, and in 1995 received the Lord Prize for contributions to science. He won the Japan Seiun Award for Dramatic Presentation with his seven-hour series, A Galactic Odyssey. In 2007 he won the Asimov Award for science writing.

    Session: 13 Panel on Bowl of Heaven
    Session: 34 How Hollywood Gets Science Wrong

  • Steve Berman

    Steve Berman has been present at SFRA conferences since 2006. He has delivered four papers at SFRA examining such topics as Michael Bishop's novel, No Enemy but Time, and Vonda N. McIntyre's novel, Dreamsnake. He has also published several film reviews in the SFRA Review, most notably a review on Cloverfield and a comparative review on Let the Right One In and its American remake, Let Me In. As an instructor of English, Film, and Art History at Oakland Community College (since 1989) in Auburn Hills, MI., Steve developed and teaches a course called Science Fiction and Fantasy both online and face-to-face.

    Session 25: Intertextuality in Fantastic Literature and Film

  • Ratnakar D. Bhelkar

    Ratnakar D. Bhelkar is an Associate Professor of English, Coordinator, Internal Quality Assurance Cell at Dhanwate National College, (Institutional Member of Asia-Pacific Quality Network, Shanghai, China) He is a receipient of Madhaorao Chandorkar Gold Medal, XII All India English Teachers' Conference Prize for topping M.A. in English, in 1985. His particular interests are Science Fiction, Fantasy Literature, Translation Studies, Comparative literature, Quality Network in Education.

    Session 6: Costume, Design, and Visual Effects in Science Fiction Film & Television

  • Andre Bormanis

    Andre Bormanis received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from the University of Arizona in 1981, and a master's degree in science, technology and public policy from George Washington University in 1994 under a NASA Space Grant Fellowship. He has worked as the Science Consultant for Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine television series and on the Star Trek Generations and Star Trek: First Contact films. He also serves as a consultant to the San Juan Institute, a non-profit planetary science research laboratory in San Juan Capistrano, California, and the Planetary Society, a non-profit space education organization in Pasadena, California. Andre is also a pianist and an avid photographer.

    Session 34: How Hollywood Gets Science Wrong

  • Mark Bould

    Mark Bould teaches at the University of the West of England, United Kingdom. He is the author of Film Noir: From Berlin to Sin City and The Cinema of John Sayles: Lone Star, co-author of The Routledge Concise History of Science Fiction, and co-editor of Parietal Games: Critical Writings By and On M. John Harrison, The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction, Fifty Key Figures in Science Fiction, Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction and Neo-Noir. He co-edits Science Fiction Film and Television, and is an advisory editor of Extrapolation, Historical Materialism, Paradoxa and Science Fiction Studies.

    Science Fiction Studies Symposium

  • Jeremy Brett

    Jeremy Brett is a Certified Archivist with an M.L.S. from the University of Maryland at College Park. An enthusiastic fan of several different media universes himself, he worked for three years as Special Collections Project Archivist at the University of Iowa, where he was instrumental in helping to develop that institution's fannish collections. He currently works at Texas A&M University, where he is Assistant Professor of Libraries and Processing Archivist.

    Session 18: Archives, Archaeology, Alternate History

  • David Brin

    David Brin is a scientist, best-selling author and tech-futurist. His novels include Earth, The Postman (filmed in 1997) and Hugo Award winners Startide Rising and The Uplift War. A leading commentator and speaker on modern trends, his nonfiction book The Transparent Society won the Freedom of Speech Award of the American Library Association. Brin's newest novel EXISTENCE explores the ultimate question: billions of planets are ripe for life.

    Session 34: How Hollywood Gets Science Wrong

  • Derek A. Burrill

    Derek A. Burrill is an Associate Professor in the Media and Cultural Studies Department at UC, Riverside. He is the author of Die Tryin': Videogames, Masculinity, Culture (Peter Lang, 2009) and his other work has appeared in Social Semiotics, Modern Drama, Text Technology, and Games and Culture, as well as in numerous anthologies.

    Session 40: Neoliberalism in SF Media

  • Andrew Calis

    Andrew Calis, when he's not teaching, he looks at things. Sometimes those things are television shows, trees, or books, but they often end up in his writing, either academic or creative. Having recently received his M.A. in English from West Virginia University, he now teaches composition classes at both WVU and Alderson-Broaddus College. Although his time is more limited these days, he still tries to look at things as often as possible.

    Session 22: "Take my love/Take my land/Take me where I cannot stand": Juridical/Environmental/Textual Colonization in Firefly

  • Ritch Calvin

    Ritch Calvin is an Assistant Professor of Womens' and Gender Studies in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory at SUNY Stony Brook. He is the President of the Science Fiction Research Association (SFRA), and the media reviews editor for the SFRA Review. His bibliography of works by and about Octavia Butler appeared in Utopian Studies (2008). His work has also appeared in the SFRA Review, Science Fiction Studies, Extrapolation, The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, and Femspec.

    Session 26: Octavia E. Butler

  • Gerry Canavan

    Gerry Canavan is currently an assistant professor in the English department at Marquette University, teaching 20th and 21st century literature. One of his current projects is a critical companion to Butler for the Modern Masters of Science Fiction series at University of Illinois Press, and is also talking with Cambridge University Press about co-editing a Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction for them at some point in the near future. Gerry Canavan received my Ph.D. from Duke University in 2012.

    Session 26: Octavia E. Butler

  • Paul Cheng

    Paul Cheng is a Ph.D candidate in English at the University of California, Riverside. His areas of study include Asian American literature and film and his dissertation will explore the phenomenon of a "Transpacific Action Cinema," tracing the movements of capital, populations, ideas and culture across the Pacific Rim and its complex relationship with visual culture.

    Session 10: Global Imaginaries in Science Fiction Media

  • Todd Cherniawsky

    Todd Cherniawsky is a production designer with Asylum Design Works. His credit include, Zero Dark Thirty, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, Beowulf, Superman Returns, War of the Worlds, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Polar Express, The Chronicles of Riddick, and Planet of the Apes

    Session 62: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Dylan Cole

    Dylan Cole is an American Digital Matte-Painter and concept artist specializing in work for film, television, and video games. Cole received a degree in fine arts from UCLA. He is best known for his work on feature films like The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Avatar, Daredevil and The Chronicles of Riddick.

    Session 62: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Emily Connelly

    Emily Connelly is a graduate student in the Literary Studies program at Portland State University. She has recently returned from Japan where she wrote on the Japanese punk scene and was a "TV talent" on NHK. Her specialization is in post-structuralism and subculture with a current focus on subculture in media works of "bubble-era" Japan.

    Session 10: Global Imaginaries in Science Fiction Media

  • Melissa Conway

    Melissa Conway is head of Special Collections and Archives at the UCR Libraries, home of Eaton Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy. She holds a Ph.D. in Medieval Studies, and publishes on pre-1600 manuscripts and the works of Dante. Her Medieval Studies degree has been very useful in administering a collection of science fiction and fantasy as both genres persistently borrow from medieval myths and concepts of the hero.

  • Istvan Csicsery-Ronay

    Istvan Csicsery-Ronay, Jr. is a university professor of English at DePauw University. He is coeditor of the Journal Science Fiction Studies as well as the book Robot Ghosts and Wired Dreams: Japanese Science Fiction from Origins to Anime (University of Minnesota Press, $20). His latest book is The Seven Beauties of Science Fiction (Wesleyan University Press, 2009)

    Science Fiction Studies Symposium
    Session 56: Ian Watson

  • Joseph Dargue

    Joseph Dargue is currently a third-year English Literature Ph.D. at the University of Cincinnati. He received his BA in English from Lancaster University in 2006, and an MA in Modern Literatures from Royal Holloway, University of London in 2008. Joseph's research interests include science fiction, comics and graphic novels, digital humanities, and film. He has presented papers on Alan Moore's Watchmen and Gary Shteyngart's Absurdistan. Joseph is also a graduate assistant at the University of Cincinnati where he has taught classes in composition, literature, and science fiction. In his free time, he likes to write science fiction, play his guitar, and build websites.

    Session 68: Masculinity and the Family in Science Fiction Film

  • Doug Davis

    Doug Davis is Associate Professor of English at Gordon State College in Barnesville, GA, where he teaches literature and creative writing. He is currently the editor of the SFRA Review. He has published articles on cold war science and culture, the relationship between science fiction and national policy, and the authors Tim O'Brien, Bobbie Ann Mason and Flannery O'Connor. He is currently working on a book manuscript, Technological Distances: Reading Flannery O'Connor in the Future.

  • Sam Davis

    Sam Davis is an artist based out of Los Angeles, CA. He is the founder and director of the Faustus Group, which, since 2010, has presented lectures, screenings, listening parties, and performances in Los Angeles, Chicago, & New York City. The Faustus Group has launch ZABMAT, a journal of contemporary science-fiction writing. Recently, Davis has lectured on distributable media, "moreness," Spinoza, the iTunes visualizer, Don Quixote, Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody, and Russian literary theorist Vladimir Propp. He has co-taught at Ox-Bow School of Art & Artist's Residency in Saugatuck, Michigan and participated in the 2012 Summer Forum for Inquiry & Exchange where artists, academics, curators, farmers, and others discussed the theme of "Community, Utopia, & The Individual."

    Session 44: Writing Technologies and Material Culture

  • Stefan Dechant

    Stefan Dechant is a Supervising Art Director whose credits include Lincoln, Alice in Wonderland, Where the Wild Things Are, The Polar Express, Minority Report, HBO’s From the Earth to the Moon, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and Waterworld.

    Session 62: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Grant Dempsey

    Grant Dempsey is currently an MA student at the University of Western Ontario's Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism. He earned his Honors BA in English, with a minor in Philosophy, at California State University, Fresno, where he also studied the Sanskrit language and its literature under Steve Adisasmito-Smith. Grant's other research interests broadly include narrative theory, hermeneutics, aesthetics, media theory, and intersections of art, philosophy, and science. He has presented work at several institutions, including Columbia University and University College Cork in Ireland.

    Session 63: Musical Influences in Science Fiction

  • Jody Duncan

    Jody Duncan is the editor of Cinefex, a position she has held for 20 years. In addition to having written nearly 200 in-depth visual effects articles for Cinefex, Duncan has written or co-written a dozen books on the making of such blockbuster movies as Terminator 2, Jurassic Park, The Lost World, Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Avatar. She also authored The Winston Effect: The Art and History of Stan Winston Studio. Her current best-seller, co-authored with Janine Pourroy, is The Art and Making of the Dark Knight Trilogy.

    Session 6: Costume, Design, and Visual Effects in Science Fiction Film & Television

  • Neil Easterbrook

    Neil Easterbrook, who teaches comparative literature, theory, and SF at TCU, has published widely on matters related to SF. He serves on the editorial advisory boards of Science Fiction Studies, Science Fiction Film and Television, JFA, and Extrapolation. In 2009, he received the Pioneer Award from SFRA for an essay on Geoff Ryman's Air and Ethics. In 2011, he was one of the featured speakers at the Science Fiction Studies Symposium. Refereed publications in 2012 include Singularities, in Science Fiction Studies; We'll all change together: Mathematics as Metaphor in Greg Egan, in Mathematics and Popular Culture (eds. Sklar and Sklar, McFarland); and The Shamelessly Fictive: Mimesis and Metafantasy in The Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies. He is completing a book about China Miéville.

    Session 50: Consciousness and Character in Science Fiction Literature and Film

  • Cheryl D. Edelson

    Cheryl D. Edelson is Associate Professor of English and English Discipline Coordinator at Chaminade University of Honolulu. Her research and teaching interests include American Literature, The Literary Gothic, Film and Television Studies, Indigenous Literatures, and Popular Culture. Cheryl regularly presents her work at national conferences such as the annual meetings of the Modern Language Association, the American Studies Association, and the Popular Culture Association. Cheryl's chapter titled "Reclaiming Plots: Albert Wendt's "Prospecting" and Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl's Ola Na Iwi as Postcolonial Neo-victorian Gothic" is forthcoming on Rodopi Press.

    Session 16: Mirror, Mirror: Intertextual Narratives of Power and Identity in Science Fiction Television

  • Paul A Elliot

    Paul A Elliot is a doctoral student in Theory and Cultural Studies at Purdue University with a focus in 20th and 21st century science fiction in literature, film and television. He is also interested in Popular Culture, Literature and Science, and Ecocritical and Postcolonial Theory.

    Session 21: Race and Afrofuturism in Music and Television

  • Matt Englund

    Matt Englund is a doctoral candidiate at Binghamton University currently at work on his dissertation, Philip K. Dick and the Act of Reading. He lives in Chapel Hill, NC.

    Session 4: Utopian Dreams and Artificial Realities

  • Zarah Ersoff

    Zarah Ersoff is a PhD candidate at University of California, Los Angeles in Musicology, specializing in nineteenth-century and early twentieth century classical music. Her dissertation examines the performance of race and sexuality in fin-de-siecle French music by Ravel, Satie and Hahn. Her secondary interests include film and television music, vocal embodiment in popular music, and the relationship between music and literature. She recently developed a new course at UCLA on sound and music in science fiction film scores.

    Session 1: Musical Performances in Science Fiction

  • Taylor Evans

    Taylor Evans is a first-year PhD student in the English program at University of California, Riverside. He earned his bachelor's degree in English and physics at the University of Florida, and his master's degree in English at the University of Central Florida.

    Session 50: Consciousness and Character in Science Fiction Literature and Film

  • Andrew Ferguson

    Andrew Ferguson is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of Virginia. His present projects include a dissertation on the hermeneutics of glitching in novels and videogames, and a critical biography of the SF writer R.A. Lafferty.

    Session 44: Writing Technologies and Material Culture
    Session 58: Gaming the Future: Science Fiction and Video Games

  • Lúcio Reis Filho

    Lúcio Reis Filho is a professor of History at the State University of Minas Gerais (UEMG) in Brazil. He has a Master Degree in Media Studies from the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) and is a member of the Brazilian Society for Film Studies and Audiovisual Media (Socine) and the Science Fiction Research Association (SFRA).

    Session 30: Rewriting Colonial Histories

  • Pawel Frelik

    Pawel Frelik is assistant professor at the Department of American Literature and Culture, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland. His scholarly interests include postmodern literature,science fiction and speculative fiction, cyberpunk, images and concepts of technology in American literature and culture, philosophy of technology, hypertext/cybertext, new media and storytelling, computer games narrativity.

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)
    Session 58: Gaming the Future: Science Fiction and Video Games
    Session 65: Video Games

  • Sheila Finch

    Sheila Finch is the author of eight science fiction novels of which Infinity's Web received the Compton Crook award and Tiger in the Sky won the 1999 San Diego Book award for best juvenile fiction. In 1998, she won Nebula Award for her novella, Reading The Bones. Her work has been collected in numerous anthologies and she's a regular contributor to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. She is most well known for her many stories about members of the Guild of Xenolinguists, the translators of the languages in the worlds we will explore in the future. Sheila served as one of the judges for this year's Student Short Story Contest.

  • Adam Frisch

    Adam Frisch is currently a professor and chairperson of the Department of Modern Languages at Briar Cliff University in Sioux City, Iowa, USA, where he has taught since 1978. Dr. Frisch served as the President of the Science Fiction Research Association in 2007-2008. Among his publications in the S.F. field have been Tension and Progress in Ken MacLeod's Engines of Light Series (The True Knowledge of Ken MacLeod, Foundation Studies in Science Fiction #3, 2003); The Subjective Objective in The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson Foundation (London, England), vol. 34, #94 (Summer 2005), 31-38; and Human, Technological and Landscape Interactions in Ken MacLeod's Night Sessions in The Postnational Fantasy, ed. Jason W. Ellis, Swaralipi Nandi, and Dr. Masood Raja. N.Y.: McFarland & Co, Inc., 2011.

    Session 9: Men, Women, and 2312

  • Sonja Fritzsche

    Sonja Fritzsche is an Associate Professor of German and Eastern European Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, IL. She earned her Ph.D. in Germanic Studies from the University of Minnesota (2001) and her M.A. in Modern European History from the University of California, Los Angeles (1995). Her research focuses on (East) German literature and film, Homeland discourse, the fairy tale, and science fiction.  Her publications include Science Fiction Literature in East Germany (Peter Lang, 2006) and articles in the German Quarterly, German Studies Review, Women in German Yearbook, Film & History, Extrapolation, Utopian Studies and Filmforum

    Session 38: Parody in Science Fiction Film

  • Ann Garascia

    Ann Garascia received her M.A. in English Literature from San Francisco State University in 2009. She is currently a Ph.D. student in the English department at University of California, Riverside. Her research interests include Victorian literature, Visual Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies. She is also completing the Designated Emphasis in Book, Archive, and Manuscript Studies.

    Session 66: Alterity and/in Science Fiction

  • Joan Gordon

    Joan Gordon is a professor of English at Nassau Community College in New York and an editor of the journals Science Fiction Studies, Humanimalia and The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. She is a former president of SFRA, winner of the Clareson Award, and recipient of a Fulbright Distinguished Professorship to Marie Curie Sklodowska University. Among her most recent writing has been a chapter on literary science fiction for a forthcoming Oxford Companion to Science Fiction.

    Session 9: Men, Women, and 2312

  • Mimi Gramatky

    Mimi Gramatky is a production designer has also worked in interior, landscape and theatre design; visual FX, animation, and documentary filmmaking. A graduate of UC Berkeley, San Francisco State University, Mimi received a Bush Fellowship, interning at the Guthrie Theatre. Her production design career began on FATSO, her mentor Anne Bancroft’s directorial debut. Miami Vice, was her first TV credit, and An Inconvenient Woman garnered her an Emmy nomination and membership into the Art Directors Guild.

    Session 55: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Kevin Grazier

    Kevin Grazier earned a B.S. degrees in computer science and geology from Purdue University, and a B.S. in physics from Oakland University. He earned his M.S. in physics from Purdue, and then went to University of California, Los Angeles for his doctoral research in planetary physics, performing long-term large-scale computer simulations of early Solar System evolution. He has serving as the science advisor for the science fiction series Eureka, Battlestar Galactica, Virtuality, The Event, and the animated/educational series The Zula Patrol.He was also editor and contributing author for the books The Science of Dune, and The Science of Michael Crichton, co-authored The Science of Battlestar Galactica, and is editing the upcoming anthology Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists.

    Session 34: How Hollywood Gets Science Wrong

  • Carl Gutiérrez-Jones

    Carl Gutiérrez-Jones is a Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has taught since 1990. He has served as the chair of his department (2001-2004 and 2012), and as the Director of the Chicano Studies Institute at UCSB (2005-2011). He pursued his undergraduate degree in English and American literature at Stanford University and his Ph.D. at Cornell University. His interests include science fiction, American studies, contemporary fiction, critical race studies and the culture of human rights. He is the author of Critical Race Narratives: A Study of Race, Rhetoric, and Injury (New York University Press, 2001), Rethinking the Borderlands: Between Chicano Narrative and Legal Discourse (University of California Press, 1995), as well as numerous articles on literature, film, legal studies and cultural theory.

    Session 3: Apocalypse and Social Change

  • Andy Hageman

    Andy Hageman is Assistant Professor of English at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa where he researches intersections of literature, techno-culture, and ecology and teaches courses in American literature, film studies, and ecological media and criticism. He has published essays on topics ranging from David Lynch's Mulholland Drive and Chinese cinema to Metropolis and Paolo Bacigalupi and is currently co-editing a volume on Science Fiction and commodities.

    Session 37: ASLE-SFRA Panel: Environmental Science Fiction Film

  • Alex Hajdu

    Alex Hajdu was born in Budapest, Hungary and immigrated to America during the Hungarian Revolution. He moved to Hollywood as a small child, growing up in the movie business and started working on set at age fifteen. His first feature film experience was as an art director on the Roger Corman production Battle Beyond The Stars working alongside Academy Award winner James Cameron and the Oscar-winning visual effects team, Robert and Dennis Skotak. Among his credits as art director are the ABC series Private Practice, In Case of Emergency, Night Stalker, the pilot for My Name Is Earl and The Visitor.

    Session 69: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Jenni Halpin

    Jenni Halpin is an assistant professor of English at Savannah State University. Her current research projects cluster around new directions in science drama, including its changing relationship to science fiction texts and movies.

    Session 23: Fans and Adaptation

  • Terry Harpold

    Terry Harpold is associate professor of English, Film, and Media Studies at the University of Florida, and the author of Ex-foliations: Reading Machines and the Upgrade Path (University of Minnesota Press, 2008). A Verne scholar and a founding member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Verniana: Jules Verne Studies / Etudes Jules Verne, his essays on Verne and extraordinary voyages have appeared in Bulletin de la Société Jules Verne, IRIS, Revue Jules Verne, Science Fiction Studies, and Verniana.

    Session 64: Jules Verne in Film, Board Games, and Advertising

  • Ray Harryhausen

    Ray Harryhausen, creator a type of stop-motion model animation known as Dynamation, will receive the 2013 J Lloyd Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award winner. for his groundbreaking contributions to science fiction film. Among his best-known productions are Mighty Joe Young, for which the RKO team won an Oscar for special effects in 1949; The 7th Voyage of Sinbad and Jason and the Argonauts, which included a swordfight against skeleton warriors.

    Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award 2013

  • Donald M. Hassler

    Donald M. Hassler has taught many years in the English Department at Kent State and published book-length work on Hal Clement, Isaac Asimov, Erasmus Darwin, and Arthur Machen. He served some 15 years as chief editor of Extrapolation.

    Session 19: Science and Science Fiction

  • Rachel Haywood Ferreira

    Rachel Haywood Ferreira is an Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Iowa State University. Her articles on early, golden age, and contemporary Latin American science fiction have appeared in Science Fiction Studies, Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, Hispania, Extrapolation, and the Revista Iberoamericana as well as in collections such as Latin American Science Fiction: Theory and Practice (Palgrave 2012) and Parabolas of Science Fiction (Wesleyan University Press, 2013). She is the author of The Emergence of Latin American Science Fiction (Wesleyan University Press, 2011).

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)

  • Michelle Harris

    Michelle Harris Heeg is a Masters student at the University of Florida researching feminist science fiction, fantasy and speculative fiction literature and media. Her other research projects include investigating gender representation in contemporary video games, and creating a digital archive for the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research at UF.

  • Elyce Rae Helford

    Elyce Rae Helford is professor of English at Middle Tennessee State University.  Her SF research and publications utilize a gender and cultural studies approach to explorations of SF literature, television, film, and fandom.  She has been presenting at Eaton conferences since 1994.

    Session 47: Adaptation, Fandom, and Genre

  • Karen Hellekson

    Karen Hellekson is an independent scholar based out of Maine. She studied with James Gunn at the University of Kansas. She has published on media studies and science fiction. She is founding coeditor of the fan studies journal Transformative Works and Cultures.

    Session 23: Fans and Adaptation

  • Howard Hendrix

    Howard Hendrix is the author of ten books, six of which are science fiction novels. He is also the author of numerous works of shorter fiction and literary criticism. During the period 1997-2007 he served as Credits and Ethics Committeee chair, Western Regional Director, and two-term vice president of Science fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).  Hendrix took his Ph.D. in English from University of California, Riverside and currently teaches at California State University, Fresno.  He lives near Shaver Lake in the central Sierra Nevada. Howard served as a judges for this year's Student Short Story Contest.

    Session 46: Science Fiction, Myth, and Media
    Session 69: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • David Higgins

    David Higgins' research examines transformations in imperial fantasy in twentieth-century literature and culture, and his work interrogates postwar science fiction to expose transformations in imperial discourse that occur during the Cold War and the climax of European decolonization. His article Toward a Cosmopolitan Science Fiction (published in the June 2011 issue of American Literature) won the 2012 SFRA Pioneer Award for excellence in scholarship. David is a full-time faculty member at Inver Hills College in Minnesota, and he has published in American Literature, Science Fiction Studies, Science Fiction Film and Television, and SFRA Review. He also recently co-edited a special issue of Science Fiction Studies on Science Fiction and Globalization (forthcoming late 2012).

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)
    Session 30: Rewriting Colonial Histories

  • Veronica Hollinger

    Veronica Hollinger is a professor in the Cultural Studies Department at Trent University in Ontario. She is a long-time co-editor of Science Fiction Studies, and co-editor of four scholarly collections on science fiction. She has published many articles on feminist and queer science fiction, on cyberpunk, and on postmodernism and post-humanism in science fiction.

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)
    Session 61: Mediation and Transmedia

  • Nalo Hopkinson

    Nalo Hopkinson was born in Jamaica, received an M.A. in writing popular fiction from Seton Hill University. Her teaching specialty is creative writing, with a focus on the literatures of the fantastic such as science fiction, fantasy and magical realism. She is currently working on "Donkey," a contemporary fantasy novel, and on "Blackheart Man," a fantastical alternate history set in an imagined Caribbean. Nalo is the Chair for this year's Student Short Story Contest.

    Special Event: Authors Reading

  • Andrew Howe

    Andrew Howe is an Associate Professor of History at La Sierra University, where he teaches courses in American history, popular culture, and film studies. Particular areas of interest include the Science Fiction genre, the films of Alfred Hitchcock, and World War II films.

    Session 17: Science Fiction and/as Social Critique

  • Winona Howe

    Winona Howe received a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Riverside in 1991. She is Professor of English at La Sierra University in Riverside, California, where she teaches courses in nineteenth-century British literature, children's literature and young adult literature. Howe has published articles on film studies, modern revisions of folk tales, Victorian authors Wilkie Collins and Charles Dickens, and the 20th-century Australian author Arthur Upfield; an ongoing research interest is the Maine regionalist author C. A. Stephens.

    Session 42: Ecological Themes in Science Fiction and Anime

  • Julian Hoxter

    Julian Hoxter is Screenwriting Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Screenwriting in the Cinema Department of San Francisco State University. Besides being a produced screenwriter, Hoxter is an award winning filmmaker and educator. He is the author of Write What You Don't Know: An Accessible Manual for Screenwriters (New York: Continuum, 2011) and the forthcoming The Pleasures of Structure: Learning Screenwriting Through Case Studies (New York: Continuum, 2014). He also writes on screenwriting history and theory, and is a contributor to the forthcoming history of Hollywood screenwriting, Beyond the Silver Screen: Screen Writing & Story Telling edited by Andrew Horton (New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2013).

    Session 24: Screenwriting: Spectacle, Specificity and Speculative Fiction

  • Richard Hunt

    Richard Hunt is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of California, Riverside. His current research areas include 20th Century U.S. Literature, Science Fiction, Rhetorical Theory, Cultural Studies, and traditions of African American and Afro-diasporic musics as social and philosophic discourse. His work in sf focuses on articulations between technology, representations of subjectivity, and concepts of listening and communication, with research into the New Wave as well as the work of Octavia E. Butler, China Mieville, and performer Janelle Monae. His dissertation, I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other, investigates, through analysis of literature and public and political discourse, the key political rationalities that govern what it means to listen, what is sayable, who is authorized to speak, and under what terms.

    Session 66: Alterity and/in Science Fiction

  • John Huntington

    John Huntington is a retired professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He currently serving as Head of the UIC English department. He is the author of two books on SF: The Logic of Fantasy: HG Wells and SF (1982), which won the Eaton award for that year, and Rationalizing Genius (1989), and numerous essays on SF.

    Session 53: Science Fiction and Illustration

  • Emily Jiang

    Emily Jiang holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Saint Mary's College of California and a BA in English from Rice University. She also is a graduate of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers' Workshop. She has been a panelist at Wiscon, Worldcon, and FogCon, and her nonfiction has been published and/or is forthcoming in Strange Horizons, Stone Telling, and the Wiscon Chronicles.

    Session 33: Time Travel in Literature, Film, and Theory

  • Joshua Johnson

    Joshua Johnson is a West Virginia University MA graduate with interests in fan studies, literary theory (especially theories of community formation and identity), narrative, and Eaton Panel Proposal 5 online citizenship. Specifically, Joshua is interested in the place fannish models and mediums of production have in forming online and offline communities and identities. His first article, Toward an Ecology of Vidding, coauthored with Dr. Tisha Turk, came out this past year in Transformative Works and Cultures.

    Session 22: "Take my love/Take my land/Take me where I cannot stand": Juridical/Environmental/Textual Colonization in Firefly

  • Michael Johnson

    Michael Johnson holds degrees in Classics from University College London and SUNY Buffalo. Since 1975 he has been on the faculty of the Modern and Classical Languages Department at Buffalo State College, where he is currently approaching the end of his 20th aggregate semester as department chair. In 2002 he received the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has over 160 publications and presentations in the fields of Biblical literature, pedagogy in the Classics, medieval Latin paleograhy, surrealism, children's literature, science fiction and fantasy.

    Session 33: Time Travel in Literature, Film, and Theory

  • Toby Braden Johnson

    Toby Braden Johnson is a doctoral candidate in the University of California, Riverside, Department of Religious Studies. He received his M.A. in Comparative Religion from Western Michigan University (2002). His dissertation work examines the production, use, interpretation and pedagogical value of storytelling in religious traditions. His work involves comparative studies of religious traditions, with specific attention given to Sikhism and Islam in South Asia, and employs theoretical programs from Phenomenology, Cognitive Science, and Narrative Studies.

    Session 11: Superhero Controversies in Comics and Television

  • Giuliano Jorge Magalhães

    Giuliano Jorge Magalhães da Silva has a degree in Social Communication - Cinema, by Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF). As audiovisual producer, Giuliano heads documentary projects and productions aimed at children and youth. As a researcher, attends the Master Program in Communication from UFF, with the dissertation Between screens and stories: the brazilian cinema and audiovisual for children.

  • Jari Käkelä

    Jari Käkelä is currently finishing his PhD at Helsinki University, Department of Modern Languages in Finland. His PhD thesis is on themes of frontier expansionism, consciousness of history and guardianship in Isaac Asimov's Foundation (and Robot) series.

    Session 5: History and Politics in Classic Science Fiction

  • Despina Kakoudaki

    Despina Kakoudaki is an assistant professor in the Department of Literature at American University in Washington DC, where she teaches courses in literature, film, and popular culture, as well as science fiction and the history of science and technology. She completed her doctorate in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley, and has also taught at Harvard University.  She co-edited a volume of new critical essays on the work of Pedro Almodóvar (with Brad Epps, University of Minnesota Press, 2009), and has published articles on race and melodrama in action and disaster films, on robots and cyborgs, and on the military role of the pin-up in WWII. Her book on the figure of the artificial person in literature and film is forthcoming from Rutgers University Press.

    Session 12: Artificial People and Marginal Bodies

  • Matthew Wilhelm Kapell

    Matthew Wilhelm Kapell is the editor of four books on SF film and television including, most recently, Star Trek as Myth and (with Stephen McVeigh) The Films of James Cameron: Critical Essays. His previous books were on the Star Wars and Matrix films and currently editing, with Andrew B.R. Elliott, a twenty-two chapter volume on the presentation of historiographical ideas in digital games which will be published by Continuum/Bloomsbury in 2013-14. He has taught history, anthropology, and media studies in the United States and Britain and holds M.A. degrees in history and anthropology and a Ph.D. in American Studies.

    Session 46: Science Fiction, Myth, and Media

  • Jennifer Kavetsky

    Jennifer Kavetsky is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of California, Riverside. Her dissertation is the evolving portrayals of manufactured humans in American science fiction and fans' reactions to these characters. Jennifer has presented papers at numerous conferences, including previous Eaton and SFRA conferences. She also has a co-authored article on medievalism and on-line gaming forthcoming from Routledge Press. Her research interests include speculative fiction, 20th century Transatlantic fiction, gender studies, fan studies, and cyberculture.

    Session 12: Artificial People and Marginal Bodies

  • Michael J. Klein

    Michael J. Klein received his Ph.D. in science and technology studies from Virginia Tech. His dissertation examined the use of science fiction literature and cinema as rhetorical tropes during policy debates on human cloning. For the past five years he has served as assistant professor of writing, rhetoric and technical communication at James Madison University. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses including scientific rhetoric, medical and science writing, and science fiction literature. His research examines the transmission of technical information from expert to lay audiences, and the depiction of science and technology in popular media.

    Session 24: Screenwriting: Spectacle, Specificity and Speculative Fiction

  • Susan Knabe

    Susan Knabe is an Assistant Professor in both the departments of Media and Information Technology and of Women's Studies and Feminist Research at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on two primary areas: HIV/AIDS and cultural production (largely in relation to the AIDS crisis experienced by gay men in the west during the 1980s and 90s) and the cultural production and social utility of young women's sexuality and sexual health, primarily through the figure of the bad girl and through HPV public health discourse. She is also interested in the representation of gender, sexuality, and race in film and media. Her co-written book, Zero Patience, was published in 2011 as part of the Arsenal Pulp Press Queer Film Classics series. She is currently revising a book, Affective Traces: AIDS Cultural Production and the Legacy of the Holocaust, for UBC Press.

    Session 29: Contemporary Queer Theories and Science Fiction

  • Dale Knickerbocker

    Dale Knickerbocker is the Linda E. McMahon Distinguished Professor in Foreign Languages and Literatures at East Carolina University. His fields include Spanish-language fantasy and science fiction, and he is currently preparing a comparative study of end-of-millenium apocalyptic fictions from Mexico, Argentina, and Spain. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the journals Extrapolation, Alambique, and Brumal, and an Associate and Reviews Editor of the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts.

    Session 52: Ethnicity and Hybridity in Science Fiction

  • Rob Latham

    Rob Latham, professor of English at University of California, Riverside, teaches contemporary American and British literature, cultural studies, and science fiction. A senior editor of the journal Science Fiction Studies since 1997, he is a member of the editorial boards of The Journal of Science Fiction Film and Television and The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts. He is the author of Consuming Youth: Vampires, Cyborgs, and the Culture of Consumption (Chicago, 2002), a study of contemporary consumer youth culture and its relationship to technological systems and discourses. He is currently completing a book on "New Wave" science fiction of the 1960s and '70s, focusing on its connections to counterculture movements and debates of the period, as well as co-editing a teaching anthology on science fiction for use in college classrooms.

    Session: 13 Panel on Bowl of Heaven

  • Nicholas C. Laudadio

    Nicholas C. Laudadio is an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he teaches classes in critical theory, science fiction, film, and music writing. His research deals with the critical, technological, and cultural history of electronic music and musical instruments and his essays have been published in Extrapolation, Science Fiction Studies, Science Fiction Film and Television, and the Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts. He is currently at work on a cultural history of electronic musical instruments as well as a project called When Not To Say Nothing at All: A Semiotics of Musical Invective.

    Session 63: Musical Influences in Science Fiction

  • David M. Lawrence

    David M. Lawrence has spent decades tripping over disciplinary boundaries in pursuit of adventure. Currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Media, Art, and Text at Virginia Commonwealth University, Lawrence has taught biology, geography, meteorology, oceanography, and journalism at several colleges and universities. He has participated in ecological expeditions to Indonesia, Canada, Mexico, and Ascension Island and in an oceanographic expedition on a tall ship into the heart of the Sargasso Sea. He has authored two books, Upheaval from the Abyss and Huntington's Disease, as well as contributed to the compilations The Science of Dune and The Science of Michael Crichton.

    Session 37: ASLE-SFRA Panel: Environmental Science Fiction Film

  • David Layton

    David Layton is Professor of English at DeVry University in Pomona, California, where he teaches Literature, Science Fiction, Ethics, Composition, and Public Speaking. He received a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of The Humanism of Doctor Who: A Critical Study in Science Fiction and Philosophy (McFarland, 2012). He has published scholarly articles about Herman Hesse, Doctor Who, Barry Malzberg, and Progressive Rock. He has also published reviews of novels, films, and music. His most recent work was a conference paper about innovative methods for teaching online senior projects, and another about Philip K. Dick's The Man in the High Castle.

    Session 36: Posthumanity in Red Dwarf and Assassin's Creed

  • Ursula K. Le Guin

    Ursula K. Le Guin, is the 2012 J. Lloyd Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award winner. She has written 20 science fiction and fantasy novels, among them The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed, each of which won Hugo and Nebula awards. She is the author of many short stories, six volumes of poetry, 13 books for children, as well as criticisms, collections of essays and screenplays.

    Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award 2012

  • Regina Yung Lee

    Regina Yung Lee is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Riverside. Her research interests include feminist theory, francophone literatures, speculative fiction, the films of Jia Zhangke, and participatory online communities (especially in transnational contexts).

    Session 14: Rethinking Gender

  • Simon Lee

    Simon Lee is a Ph.D. student in English at the University of California at Riverside. He writes about 20th century British literature and culture, focusing on formal innovation in modernist and post-war texts. With a background in the visual arts, Simon's work also engages aesthetic questions of identity and subject formation within contemporary art practices.

    Session 10: Global Imaginaries in Science Fiction Media

  • Stan Lee

    Stan Lee, former president of Marvel Comics, also will be recognized with the J Lloyd Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award for 2013 for his various contributions in the realm of comic books. Lee, who began as a comic-book writer at age 19, moved on to become editor, producer, publisher, and president and chairman of Marvel Comics. The co-creator of Spider-Man, The Hulk, The X-Men, The Fantastic Four, Iron Man, Thor and other superheroes is also being recognized for his successful challenge to the Comics Code Authority.

    Eaton Lifetime Achievement Award 2013

  • Dan Leopard

    Dan Leopard is Associate Professor of Media Studies and Communication at Saint Mary's College in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has published essays in Cinema Journal and the edited collections Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games and Convergence Media History. His book Teaching with the Screen: Pedagogy, Agency, and Media Culture was recently published by Routledge.

    Session 70: Science Fiction and Social Media

  • Christopher Leslie

    Christopher Leslie is an Instructor of Media and Technology Studies at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University in Brooklyn, New York. He is co-director of the Science and Technology Studies program and is the academic advisor for students in that major and in Sustainable Urban Environments. He teaches courses in the history of the Internet, the history of science, multicultural U.S. literature, and science fiction. In 2007, he took his doctorate from the City University of New York Graduate Center in English with a focus on American Studies. He is currently preparing a book manuscript based on his dissertation, tentatively titled The Future Has No Known Competitor: Social Construction of Technology in Science Fiction.

    Session 45: Radio and Sound Technology

  • Andrew “Drew” Leung

    Andrew “Drew” Leung is a concept artist, matte painter, and VFX designer. Grounded in traditional drawing and painting, his unique past in illustration, matte painting, and visual effects combined with state of the art technological prowess brings special insight into story-driven concept design. His more recent work is Real Steel; as a concept designer on this film, he worked on the design of two of the main robots as well as many of the props and sets.

    Session 69: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Mingming Liu

    Mingming Liu is a 5th-year PhD candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature at University of California, Riverside, specializing in classical Chinese literature, religious studies, as well as science fiction and fantasy in the European and Anglo-Saxon traditions. Mingming obtained her Master's degree in East Asian Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. Her current research focus is on medieval Chinese zhiguai – a particular form of ghost stories – and the possibility of its being established as a genre in world literature, with interests in feminist studies, minority discourses, and their intersections with SF.

    Session 47: Adaptation, Fandom, and Genre

  • Brian Loftus

    Brian Loftus received his Ph.D. and MA from the University of California at Irvine and his BA from the University of California at Riverside. He has taught at the University of California at Santa Barbara, The Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of California at Irvine.

    Session 6: Costume, Design, and Visual Effects in Science Fiction Film & Television

  • Marie Lottmann

    Marie Lottmann studied Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in Berlin and wrote her Master Thesis on Biology and Communication in the Fictional Invasions from Mars, 1897. She is currently working on a Ph.D. thesis on Aesthetics and Politics in Science Fiction Television at the Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture in Giessen, Germany. Her research interest include aesthetics, epistemology, utopianism, history and philosophy of science and technology, feminist and queer theory, early modern literature, authorship and forgery.

  • Bradford Lyau

    Bradford Lyau earned his degrees in history (BA—University of California, Berkeley; MA, Ph.D.—University of Chicago) and has taught at various universities in California and in Europe. He has written a book, The Anticipation Novelists of 1950s French Science (McFarland & Company), which examines popular French science fiction in light of its ideological roots. When not engaged in scholarship, he divides his time between a high-tech start-up company and political consulting.

    Session 5: History and Politics in Classic Science Fiction

  • Justin Lynn

    Justin Lynn is a graduate student in the Masters program for Experimental Psychology at California State University, Fullerton. After earning his Bachelor degrees in Psychology and Applied Behavioral Science from the University of Kansas, Justin joined the Evolutionary Psychology Lab at CSUF in the Fall of 2010. While he is fascinated by most EP-based inquiries, his main research interests lie in areas of mating and the effects of oestrus on mating behavior.

    Session 28: Learning from Science Fiction

  • Anthony Macías

    Anthony Macías is Associate Professor and Graduate Advisor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of the book, Mexican American Mojo: Popular Music, Dance, and Urban Culture in Los Angeles, 1935-1968 (Duke University Press, 2008), and he has published articles in The Jewish Role in American Life Annual Review, The Journal of African American History, Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, and American Quarterly. The working title of his current research project is: Chicano-Chicana Americana: National Character, Race, and Representation in Popular Culture.

    Session 30: Rewriting Colonial Histories

  • Shawn Malley

    Shawn Malley teaches Cultural and Media Studies in the Department of English at Bishop's University in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He is writing a book under the title Excavating the Future: Archaeology and Geopolitics in Contemporary Science Fiction Television and Film. Parts of this project are due to be published in Genre: Forms of Discourse and Culture and in International Journal of Baudrillard Studies. He has been a member of the SFRA for three years.

    Session 18: Archives, Archaeology, Alternate History

  • Miles Mancini

    Miles Mancini is Instructor II in the Department of Communication and Philosophy at Florida Gulf Coast University.

    Session 28: Learning from Science Fiction

  • Geoffrey T. Mandel

    Geoffrey T. Mandel is a production artist and designer who was the scenic artist for Star Trek: Insurrection, the sixth and seventh seasons of Star Trek: Voyager, and the first season of Star Trek: Enterprise. Prior to this, however, he was a production assistant in the art department of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in 1994 and was also involved in the production of Star Trek Generations. More recently he was a graphic designer on 2009's Star Trek. As a graphic designer, Mandel has worked on various genre shows, including The X-Files, 2005 film Serenity and the films Spider-Man.

    Session 69: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Jean-Michel Margot

    Jean-Michel Margot is an internationally recognized specialist on Jules Verne. He has served as president of the North American Jules Verne Society and a member of the Board of Directors of the Société Jules Verne in Paris. He has published several books and numerous articles on Jules Verne and his work. Of Swiss origin, but established for twenty years in the U.S., he is a bridge between Francophone Vernian research in Europe and Anglophone Vernian studies, mainly in America. Among his publications are the introduction and notes for the first English translation of Journey Through the Impossible (Prometheus, 2003), Jules Verne en son temps (Amiens, encrage, 2004), and the first English translation of The Kip Brothers (Wesleyan University Press, 2007). He is a member of the editorial board of Verniana and responsible for making it available online (www.verniana.org).

    Session 64: Jules Verne in Film, Board Games, and Advertising

  • Melanie A. Marotta

    Melanie A. Marotta is a Lecturer in the Department of English and Language Arts at Morgan State University, and received her PhD in English from Morgan State University. Marotta has previously published an article in Theory in Action titled Liberation through Acceptance of Nature and Technology in Octavia E. Butler's Parable of the Sower and a chapter essay titled Acceptance of the Diaspora as Method of Escape in Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring and Midnight Robber, which appeared in Creoles, Diasporas, Cosmopolitanisms: The Creolization of Nations, Cultural Migrations, Global Languages and Literatures. Marotta is currently editing her chapter essay, Longing for Fulfillment: The Temptation of the Californian Life in Sam Shepard's True West and Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust, which will be published in a collection about American West literature and Films (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2013). In her dissertation, The Influence of Rural and Urban Areas on the Female Communities in the Works of Toni Cade Bambara, Gayl Jones, and Toni Morrison, Marotta shows that culture, gender, class, ethnicity, and place greatly influence the formation of the identities of the female characters studied.

    Session 26: Octavia E. Butler

  • Simona Martini

    Simona Martini, PhD. in English Studies – Department of Language Sciences and Comparative Foreign Literatures, Università degli Studi, Milan, Italy and Department of Modern Languages, Cultures and Literatures at Università D'Annunzio, Pescara, Italy.

    Session 45: Radio and Sound Technology

  • Leon Marvell

    Leon Marvell is Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at Deakin University, Australia, and one of the founding members of the SF Research Group in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University. He is a writer who regularly contributes theoretical pieces and SF reviews to arts journals and Australian arts web portals, as well as being a digital media visual artist who has exhibited internationally.

    Session 17: Science Fiction and/as Social Critique

  • Noah Mass

    Noah Mass is a Marion Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. His interests include twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature, southern literature, African-American literature, regionalism, and transnational studies. His work has appeared in Studies in American Fiction and in the edited collection Science Fiction And The Two Cultures. He is working on a book project in which he examines the effect of the Great Migration on southern literature in the twentieth century.

    Session 52: Ethnicity and Hybridity in Science Fiction

  • Ferne Merrylees

    Ferne Merrylees is a currently undertaking her Masters of Philosophy in Creative Writing at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her critical focus is the role of social media in young adult science fiction.

    Session 23: Fans and Adaptation

  • Maureen F. McHugh

    Maureen F. McHugh is a science fiction and fantasy writer. Her first published story appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in 1989. Since then, she has written four novels and over twenty short stories.

    Special Event: Authors Reading

  • Christopher McKitterick

    Christopher McKitterick, science fiction writer and Director of the J. Wayne and Elsie Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas, has worked with James Gunn for close to two decades. As the Center's Director, Chris continues offering Jim's Intensive Summer Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction and the Summer Writer's Workshops, hosting the Campbell Conference, and managing the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. Chris's short stories have appeared in numerous SF magazines and original anthologies, including Analog, Artemis, Captain Proton, E-Scape, Extrapolation, Mythic Circles, NOTA, Ruins: Extraterrestrial, Sentinels In Honor of Arthur C. Clarke, Synergy SF, Tomorrow SF, Top Deck magazine, various TSR publications, and Visual Journeys. His debut novel Transcendence was published by Hadley Rille Books in 2010.

    Session 67: Celebrating James Gunn: Writer, Scholar, Teacher

  • Rubén Mendoza

    Rubén Mendoza is doctoral student in the Department of English at University of California, Riverside. His areas of focus are in rhetorical studies, aesthetics and affect, Chicana/o Studies, Latin American narratives of neoliberalism, and post-WWII American speculative fiction. He has taught Chicana/o Studies and Composition at East Los Angeles College and California State University, Northridge.

    Session 59: Labor and Capital in Science Fiction

  • Larisa Mikhaylova

    Larisa Mikhaylova is a literary critic and translator from Moscow, Russia. She received her Ph.D. at the Moscow State University for the thesis New Trends in British and American Science Fiction (1960-1980s). She teaches 20th century world literature and a course History and Translation of Science Fiction at the Moscow State University, Department of Journalism. Her areas of research include evolution of drama,  science fiction and gender aspects of culture in Great Britain, USA and Russia. She translated fiction by many SF authors, among them Ursula Le Guin and Pat Cadigan.

    Session 48: Comparative Science Fiction Traditions

  • Glyn Morgan

    Glyn Morgan is a postgraduate student in the third year of his part-time Ph.D. at the University of Liverpool, where his research is focussed on alternate history and the Second World War. He was previously a graduate with honors from the University of Liverpool's MA course in Science Fiction Studies. He has presented papers based on his research at seminars and conferences at the University of Liverpool, including at both Current Research in Speculative Fiction conferences in 2011 and 2012, for which he was also the chief conference organizer. He has also presented a paper at the International Conference for The Second World War: Popular Culture and Cultural Memory at the University of Brighton.

    Session 18: Archives, Archaeology, Alternate History

  • Katie Moylan

    Katie Moylan lectures in media and cultural theory at the University of Leicester. Her research interests include the critical functions of television drama and community representation in radio; her book, Broadcasting Diversity: Migrant Representation in Irish Radio, is forthcoming from Intellect. She previously worked as a features journalist and arts reviewer across Irish print and broadcast media before completing her Ph.D. in 2009.

    Session 14: Rethinking Gender

  • Graham J. Murphy

    Graham J. Murphy has intersecting academic interest in science fiction, utopian writing, and/or graphic novels, including insect ontologies within human-animal studies, the complex relationships of utopianism and technoculture, and theories of the posthuman. He co-edited Beyond Cyberpunk: New Critical Perspectives, co-authored Ursula K. Le Guin: A Critical Companion, and has published articles in Science Fiction Studies, Extrapolation, Foundation, The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction, Fifty Key Figures in Science Fiction, ImageText: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies, and Contemporary American Comics: Creators and their Contexts, to name a few. He is Professor, School of English and Liberal Studies (Faculty of Business) at Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology (Toronto).

    Session 11: Superhero Controversies in Comics and Television

  • Hema Nair

    Hema Nair  is Associate Professor of English at the N.S.S. College for Women, Trivandrum, Kerala, India. She is also Associate Editor of Samyukta: A Journal of Women's Studies which is published by a collective of women professionals in Trivandrum. She was the Fulbright Visiting Lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Madison during Fall 2003. She won a Post Doctoral Research Award of the University Grants Commission, India during 2006 -09 and has several articles and translations to her credit. Apart from SF by women, she is interested in women's studies, translation studies and twentieth century fiction.

    Session 57: Indian Science Fiction

  • Alex Naylor

    Alex Naylor is lecturer in Film and Visual Culture at the University of Greenwich, London.  Her research centers in film genre studies, from a dissertation on 1930s horror to a current book project on censorship and film genre.  Helford and Naylor are currently working on an article manuscript anime/manga fandom communities and co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Science Fiction Film and Television on anime (forthcoming 2014).

    Session 47: Adaptation, Fandom, and Genre

  • Ryan Nichols

    Ryan Nichols is currently on a fellowship at the Centre for Human Evolution, Cognition and Culture studying the cultural evolution and transmission of religion in a research group that comes as close as anything to doing Psychohistory. His permanent appointment is in the Department of Philosophy at Cal State Fullerton. He wrote Philosophy Through Science Fiction. His favorite novelist is Iain M. Banks.

    Session 28: Learning from Science Fiction

  • Phil Nichols

    Phil Nichols is Course Leader for Commercial Video Production at the University of Wolverhampton, and teaches screenwriting and practical filmmaking. He holds an MA in Screenwriting, and is working on a Ph.D. at Liverpool University (supervised by Prof. David Seed) with a primary focus on the screen works of Ray Bradbury. He serves on the Advisory Board of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies (Indiana University). Previous papers have appeared in The New Ray Bradbury Review and in the books Science Fiction Across Media, Visions of Mars and When Genres Collide. His website at www.bradburymedia.co.uk catalogues and reviews Bradbury's work across all media, and is the most extensive bibliography and filmography of Bradbury on the web.

    Session 24: Screenwriting: Spectacle, Specificity and Speculative Fiction

  • Larry Niven

    Larry Niven is an American science fiction author. His best-known work is Ringworld, which received Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards. His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics.

    Session: 13 Panel on Bowl of Heaven

  • Kristin Noone

    Kristin Noone is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Riverside, where she is working on a dissertation exploring revisions of medieval heroes—King Arthur, Beowulf, Robin Hood—in fantasy fiction. She has published articles on Neil Gaiman's Beowulf, Joss Whedon's Dollhouse, and Arthurian translations in World of Warcraft, and recently edited the essay collection Welsh Mythology in Popular Culture (McFarland, 2011). She also occasionally publishes short fantasy stories, when not working on the dissertation!

    Session 49: Elements of Fantasy in Rowling, McKinley, and Milton

  • Keren Omry

    Keren Omry's work on music and popular culture is part of a larger project investigating the dialogue between aesthetics and technology as it is articulated in terms of fractal geometry.   She lectures and has published on popular narratives, with particular focus on science fiction and popular culture, as they intersect with constructions of identity. Omry was awarded her Ph.D. in English Literature at the University of London, where she explored the relationship between jazz and African-American literature of the twentieth century. Her publications include Cross-Rhythms: Jazz Aesthetics in African-American Literature (Continuum, 2008); Bond, Benjamin, Balls: Technologised Masculinity in Casino Royale, in Revisioning 007 (Wallflower Press, forthcoming); Literary Free Jazz, in African American Review (2007); A Cyborg Performance: Gender and Genre in Octavia Butler, in Phoebe (2005).

    Session 41: Approaches to Science Fiction(al) Music

  • Stanley Orr

    Stanley Orr is a professor of English at the University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu. He teaches courses in writing, literature, and film studies. His publications include essays in PostScript: Essays in Film and the Humanities, Literature/Film Quarterly, Paradoxa: Studies in World Literary Genres, and Jouvert: A Journal of Postcolonial Studies. Orr serves with the Editorial Board of the The Pearson Custom Library: Introduction to Literature and has recently published the book It Was Not Midnight: Colonial Adventure, Postmodernism, and American Noir (The Ohio State University Press, 2010).

    Session 16: Mirror, Mirror: Intertextual Narratives of Power and Identity in Science Fiction Television

  • Eric Otto

    Eric Otto is Associate Professor of Environmental Humanities at Florida Gulf Coast University. He is the author of Green Speculations: Science Fiction and Transformative Environmentalism (2012, Ohio State UP).

    Session 28: Learning from Science Fiction

  • Michael Page

    Michael Page is the author of The Literary Imagination from Erasmus, Darwin to H.G. Wells: Science, Evolution, Ecology (Ashgate, 2012) and several articles on Romanticism and on science fiction, including the entry on Romantic era science fiction in The Encyclopedia of Romantic Literature (Blackwells, 2012). He is currently working on two book projects, Views of the Land: Romanticism, Agriculture, Landscape and Ecology and Ecology and Science Fiction. He edited The Man with a Strange Head and Other Early Science Fiction Stories by Miles J. Breuer for the Bison Frontiers of the Imagination series (2008). A regular attendee of the Campbell Conference in Lawrence, Kansas, Mike participated in James Gunn's Intensive Institute for the Study of Science Fiction in 2007 and 2008.

    Session 67: Celebrating James Gunn:  Writer, Scholar, Teacher

  • Wendy Gay Pearson

    Wendy Gay Pearson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Women's Studies and Feminist Research at the University of Western Ontario. She specializes in work on (mainly queer) sexuality and its intersections with gender, race, indigeneity and class. She explores these issues in three sets of texts --- science fiction and speculative fiction, Canadian literature and film, and worldwide Indigenous film cultures ---and is particularly interested in the intersections between these areas. She is the co-editor with Veronica Hollinger and Joan Gordon of Queer Universes: Sexualities in Science Fiction and has published widely on queer perspectives on science fiction as well as on contemporary queer cultures in Canada. She is also the co-author, with Susan Knabe, of Zero Patience, part of the Arsenal Pulp Press Queer Film Classics series.

    Session 29: Contemporary Queer Theories and Science Fiction

  • Mike Perschon

    Mike Perschon teaches introductory English courses full time at Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta. Perschon holds an M.A. in Comparative Literature from the University of Alberta, and is in the process of completing his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature there very soon. His M.A. thesis was on Fairy Tale Films, focusing on Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, and his Ph.D. dissertation identified and explored key features of the steampunk aesthetic. Perschon has written on speculative literature in general online at Tor.com, his own blog, and for a number of fanzines; his scholarly publications have focused largely on steampunk, appearing in Verniana, the Journal of Neo Victorian Studies, Locus, and two anthologies. Perschon is a dynamic speaker, and presents regularly on scholarly perspectives on speculative literature at fan conventions around North America.

    Session 43: Reading 1950s Science Fiction Film

  • Kirk Petruccelli

    Kirk Petruccelli is production designer whose credits include The Incredible Hulk, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Ghost Rider, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider and Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life.

    Session 55: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Kavita Philip

    Kavita Philip is author of Civilizing Natures (2003 and 2004), and co-editor of the volumes Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization (with Monshipouri, Englehart, and Nathan, 2003), Multiple Contentions (with Skotnes, 2003), Homeland Securities (with Reilly and Serlin, 2005), and Tactical Biopolitics (with da Costa, 2008). Her research interests are in transnational studies of science and technology; feminist technocultures; gender, race, globalization and postcolonialism; environmental history; and new media theory. Her work in progress includes a monograph entitled Proper Knowledge.

    Session 51: Seventh Sense and Technological Nationalism: Watching Global SF Film Doing Postcolonial Theory

  • Paul S. Price

    Paul S. Price has a B.A. in Chemistry and M.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Maryland and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Toxicology from the University of Utrecht. He also holds a graduate degree in theology from Regent College, Vancouver, Canada. Dr. Price joined the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1979 as an early practitioner in the field of exposure and risk assessment. He left EPA in 1987 to join the American Petroleum Institute to address issues related to the regulation of air emissions, hazardous waste, and exposures to benzene. In 1991 he became a consultant on risk and exposure issues for government and industry. In 1999 he cofounded The LifeLine Group, a nonprofit organization that builds software that assesses dietary and residential exposures. In 2006 he joined The Dow Chemical Company as a Risk Assessment Leader. At Dow he has directed a research program to assess risks from mixtures. He is currently leading Dow's program on Cheminformatics. He has published more than 50 papers and book chapters. In his spare time, he studies the impact of science and technology on society as reflected in the popular cultures of the United States and Japan.

    Session 7: Gender Roles and Masquerade

  • Eric S. Rabkin

    Eric S. Rabkin is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Professor of English Language and Literature, and Professor of Art and Design at the University of Michigan.  His publishing and teaching have been recognized by his selection as a winner of the Pilgrim Award for lifetime achievement in Science Fiction criticism. 

    Session 28: Learning from Science Fiction

  • Amy J. Ransom

    Amy J. Ransom is associate professor of French and Québec Studies at Central Michigan University. She has published and presented widely on Québec's science-fiction, fantasy and horror literature and film, including a book, Science Fiction from Québec: A Postcolonial Study. In addition, she has published on Haitian-Québécois writers Gérard Étienne, Dany Laferrière and Stanley Péan in Canadian Literature, with three book chapters on this topic forthcoming. Her current book project focuses on representations of hockey in Québec popular culture, with essays already appearing on this topic in Quebec Studies and Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature.

    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)
    Session 48: Comparative Science Fiction Traditions

  • Ricardo Reyna Jr.

    Ricardo Reyna Jr. is an adjunct instructor in the Department of Film with a specialization on production and Latin American Cinema at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His interests include race and mass media. More specifically his work examines the representation of Latinas/os in U.S. media.

    Session 20: Battlestar Galactica

  • John Rieder

    John Rieder is professor of English at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, where he regularly teaches courses on science fiction and on critical theory. He is the author of Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction (2008) and Wordsworth's Counterrevolutionary Turn (1997). Recent essays include On Defining Science Fiction, or Not: Genre Theory, SF, and History, in Science Fiction Studies July 2010, and The Return to the Frontier in the Extraordinary Voyage: Verne's The Mysterious Island and Kubrick's 2001 in Extrapolation Summer 2010.

    Session 21: Race and Afrofuturism in Music and Television
    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)

  • Ellen M. Rigsby

    Ellen M. Rigsby is an Associate Professor of Communication at Saint Mary's College of California.  She is interested in the ways people imagine government, both from a philosophical perspective and a literary one, and her works sits at the intersection of political theory and the study of speculative fiction.  She has published on Arendt and on Ursula Le guin, and is currently working on the representation of post-colonial relationships from the perspective of former colonies.

    Session 31: Afrofuturism in Art, Television, and Comics

  • Darcie Rives-East

    Darcie Rives-East is currently an Assistant Professor of English at Augustana College (Sioux Falls, SD). Her teaching and research interests include American literature, women's and ethnic studies, popular culture, science fiction, and critical theory. Dr. Rives-East is presently working on a book-length study of themes of policing and surveillance in post-9/11 American and British television. Her publications include Haunted by Violence: Edith Wharton's The Decoration of Houses and Her Gothic Fiction in The Edith Wharton Review and the essay Speculative Fiction in Books and Beyond: The Greenwood Encyclopedia of New American Reading.

    Session 2: Creature Features: Science Fictional Cinematic Approaches to Animals

  • Benjamin J. Robertson

    Benjamin J. Robertson is an instructor in the English department at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he teaches courses on media theory, contemporary literature, and elves. He is working on two book projects: The Age of the World Playlist and Here at the end of all things: Genre, Media, and the Horizon of History.

    Session 61: Mediation and Transmedia

  • Barry Robison

    Barry Robison is a production designer whose credits include the most recent, Pitch Perfect, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Wedding Crashers and the television series, They Came From Outer Space.

    Session 55: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Warren Rochelle

    Warren Rochelle is a Professor of English at the University of Mary Washington, in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He earned a Ph.D. (1997) in English from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He has had his critical work on science fiction and fantasy published in such journals as Foundation (1999, 2002, 2005, 2006) and Extrapolation (1996, 1999, 2006, 2007). His critical work, Communities of the Heart: the Rhetoric of Myth in the Fiction of Ursula K. Le Guin, was published by Liverpool University Press in 2001. His creative works have appeared in various journals such as Icarus, Collective Fallout, The North Carolina Literary Review, Forbidden Lines, Aboriginal Science Fiction, Colonnades, and Graffiti, as well as the Asheville Poetry Review, GW Magazine, Crucible, The Charlotte Poetry Review, Romance and Beyond, and in The Silver Gryphon (2003), a short story collection. He is also the author of three novels: The Wild Boy (2001), Harvest of Changelings (2007), and The Called (2010), all published by Golden Gryphon Press.

    Session 15: Gods and Monsters in Science Fiction Television

  • Umberto Rossi

    Umberto Rossi, is an Italian literary critic who has published several academic articles on such SF authors as J.G. Ballard, Philip K. Dick, Thomas M. Disch, Jonathan Lethem, Valerio Evangelisti. He has recently published a monograph on Dick, The Twisted Worlds of Philip K. Dick, with McFarland. He has also written essays on war literature, postmodernist fiction and G.K. Chesterton. He has translated into Italian works by Harlan Ellison, Philip K. Dick, Thomas M. Disch.

    Session 56: Ian Watson

  • Dibs Roy

    Dibs Roy is currently a doctoral student in the Department of English at West Virginia University. His research interests are in the field of nuclear rhetoric and its influence on representations of gender and sexuality in contemporary literary and cultural texts. Dibs completed is postgraduate degree (M.Litt) from the University of Glasgow, during which he was awarded the Glasgow Postgraduate Excellence Scholarship. Recently, he was awarded the Richard Tuerk "Out of This World" Paper Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy at the Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association (SWTX PCA/ACA) 2012 conference, held in Albuquerque, NM, for his paper on post-apocalyptic spaces.

    Session 22: "Take my love/Take my land/Take me where I cannot stand": Juridical/Environmental/Textual Colonization in Firefly

  • Roxanne Samer

    Roxanne Samer is a Ph.D. student in Critical Studies at the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts. Her research interests include experimental cinema, science fiction, queer theory and feminist fandom. She has recently published in the media studies journal Jump Cut and the edited collection Futures of Feminism and Fandom: The WisCon Chronicles Volume 6.

    Session 8: Science Fiction Fan Cultures and Feminist Critique

  • Peter Sands

    Peter Sands is associate chair of the English Department at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in science fiction, utopias, and law and literature. He is currently at work on a book-length treatment of law and legal systems in utopian fiction and film.

    Session 4: Utopian Dreams and Artifical Realities

  • Valérie Savard

    Valérie Savard is a PhD student in her second year at the University of Alberta's Department of English and Film Studies. Her dissertation interrogates the manner in which the social implications of bio-technological progress is attached to and embodied in the cyborg and avatar in visual and literary texts of the 20th and 21st centuries. She completed her Masters in Cultural Studies and Critical Theory at McMaster University and her Bachelor of Arts in English at Dalhousie University. She has recently presented conference papers on the concept of the non-violent zombie (Canadian Popular Culture Association, 2012) and on Morrissey as an aging male rock star (International Association for the Study of Popular Music, Canada, 2011).

    Session 66: Alterity and/in Science Fiction

  • Bradley Schauer

    Bradley Schauer is assistant professor of film and television at the University of Arizona. His research interests include the American film industry, cult & exploitation cinema, and the American comic book industry. His work has appeared in journals such as THE VELVET LIGHT TRAP, THE QUARTERLY REVIEW OF FILM & VIDEO, and THE NEW REVIEW OF FILM AND TELEVISION STUDIES. He is currently adapting his dissertation, entitled The Pulp Paradox: Science Fiction and the Exploitation Tradition in Hollywood, 1950-1986, into a book manuscript.

    Session 43: Reading 1950s Science Fiction Film

  • Oliver Scholl

    Oliver Scholl is a production designer who has worked on such films as Battleship, Stealth, Elektra, The Polar Express, A.I. Artificial Intelligence, Titan A.E., Mission to Mars, Bicentennial Man, The Haunting, Batman Forever, and Stargate.

    Session 55: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Gray Scott

    Gray Scott is an assistant professor of English and director of first-year composition at Texas Woman's University. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Riverside, is a regular contributor to the St. Martin's Guide to Writing series of textbooks, and has published articles on science-fiction author Neal Stephenson, on the Shakespeare authorship debate, and on composition pedagogy.

    Session 49: Elements of Fantasy in Rowling, McKinley, and Milton

  • Scott Selisker

    Scott Selisker is an ACLS New Faculty Fellow at University of California, Santa Barbara, currently completing his first book manuscript, entitled Human Programming: The Brainwashing Narrative and American Exceptionalism. His paper for Eaton/SFRA is related to this project, as are publications on Ralph Ellison's use of automata in American Literature (winner of the 2011 Norman Foerster Prize) and a forthcoming article in NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction on cults in the work of David Mitchell and Haruki Murakami. Scott has also written for the Science Fiction section at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

    Session 61: Mediation and Transmedia

  • Alex Shafer

    Alex Shafer is a Ph.D. Graduate student in Hispanic Studies at University of California, Riverside. He is author of Borges and the Death of the Detective, La Marca Hispanica, 2010 and has presented his research on Borges and SF at the Ometeca conference for Science and Literature in 2010. His research interests include, Gender and Sexuality, Contemporary Latin American Narrative, SF Studies, and Film and Media Studies. His dissertation is titled Cyborgs in Latin American Science Fiction and the Question of Queerness.

    Session 32: Queering the Genre

  • Steven Shaviro

    Steven Shaviro is the DeRoy Professor of English at Wayne State University. He is the author of The Cinematic Body (1993), Doom Patrols: A Theoretical Fiction About Postmodernism (1997), Connected, Or, What It Means To Live in the Network Society (2003), Without Criteria: Kant, Whitehead, Deleuze, and Aesthetics (2009), and Post-Cinematic Affect (2010). His work in progress involves studies of speculative realism, of post-continuity styles in contemporary cinema, of music videos, and of recent science fiction and horror fiction. 

    Session 50: Consciousness and Character in Science Fiction Literature and Film

  • Don Shay

    Don Shay is founder and publisher of Cinefex, a quarterly film magazine that has been covering the field of visual effects since 1980. He has written extensively on motion pictures and effects technology; and has co-written, with Cinefex editor Jody Duncan, books on the making of Ghostbusters, Terminator 2 and Jurassic Park. Shay contributed video interviews to laserdisc and DVD special edition supplements of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Alien and Aliens; and, for four seasons, he served as visual effects consultant for The Discovery Channel series, Movie Magic. The Visual Effects Society honored him with its Board of Directors Award in 2005. He is also the author of Endangered Liaisons, a collection of wildlife photographs and colorful reminiscences about the safari experience, based on his 20 years of travel throughout Africa.

    Session 6: Costume, Design, and Visual Effects in Science Fiction Film & Television

  • Rebekah Sheldon

    Rebekah Sheldon received her doctorate in English from the CUNY Graduate Center for a dissertation on the child-figure in contemporary discourses of futurity. She is currently editing and revising that manuscript as well as working on a new project- Affective Futurities: Non-Representational Criticism and the Physics of Reading. The purpose of this project is to shift the focus of our compositional and readerly practices from representation, content, and epistemology to affect, relationality, and aesthetics. She has presented papers at the SFRA, IAFA, MLA and Society for Utopian Studies conferences, among others.

    Session 29: Contemporary Queer Theories and Science Fiction

  • George Slusser

    George Slusser is Curator Emeritus of the Eaton Collection and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emeritus at University of California, Riverside. He has authored and/or edited nearly 30 books and over 130 articles, mostly on science fiction and problems of science and literature. In 1979, Slusser inaugurated Eaton conferences.

    Session 34: How Hollywood Gets Science Wrong

  • Stephanie A. Smith

    Stephanie A. Smith took her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1990, and is a professor of English at the University of Florida. She is the author of three novels, Snow-Eyes, The Boy Who Was Thrown Away (Atheneum 1985, 1987), Other Nature (MacMillan, 1995), two critical works, Conceived By Liberty (Cornell 1995) and Household Words (Minnesota, 2006). She has held fiction residencies at Dorland, Norcroft and Hedgebrook, and has worked at Provincetown Fine Arts Center; in 1998, she held an NEH fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles. Currently she works on a book about publishing and American letters, The Muse and the Marketplace.

    Session 25: Intertextuality in Fantastic Literature and Film

  • Brent Smith-Casanueva

    Brent Smith-Casanueva is a Ph.D. student in Cultural Studies and a Graduate Council Fellow at Stony Brook University. His research interests include: Science Fiction and Fantasy film and television; Marxist, postcolonial, and queer theory; continental philosophy and social theory; punk rock subcultures; globalization and transnationalisms; and the history of media technologies. His work has appeared in the Rupkatha Journal and CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture, and he has a chapter in a forthcoming collection on race and nationality in the works of Joss Whedon.

    Session 39: Mobility and Temporality

  • Ward Smith

    Ward Smith is a librarian who works with academics, activists and artists to implement information systems that aid in the development and documention of their work. He has recently worked with the Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless, the Arts, Computation, Engineering program at the University of California, Irvine, the University of California,Los Angeles Digital Libraries Program, the Southern California Library, and rhizome.org.

    Session 51: Seventh Sense and Technological Nationalism: Watching Global SF Film Doing Postcolonial Theory

  • Matthew Snyder

    Matthew Snyder received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside's Department of English, and his areas of study include film and visual culture, postcolonial and American literature. Only recently has he undergone Jedi training in SF, but only furtively from a mail-order catalogue and recovered comic books. His dissertation, entitled, Welcome to the Suck: Film and Media Phantasms of the Gulf War was an extended cultural studies work on the cinema of that war and its critical refraction of Colonialism, Inc. as seen in the works of Werner Herzog and David O. Russell. He currently resides at University of California, Riverside as a lecturer, teaching film and rhetoric for the University Writing Program.

    Session 4: Utopian Dreams and Artificial Realities

  • Vivian Sobchack

    Vivian Sobchack is an American cinema and media theorist and cultural critic. Sobchack's work on science fiction films and phenomenology of film is perhaps her most recognized.

    Science Fiction Studies Symposium

  • Melissa Colleen Stevenson

    Melissa Colleen Stevenson received her Ph.D. in English at University of California, Santa Barbara in 2005 with a dissertation that focused on the ways in which definitions of what it means to be human and the human experience as represented in science fiction is impacted by historical moments of technological change. She has since taught at both Georgia Tech and Stanford University, where she currently teaches and works in academic advising. In 2004, Melissa won the SFRA graduate student paper award for her essay Single Cyborg Seeking Same: The Post-Human and the Problem of Loneliness.

    Session 60: Memory, Imagination, and Nostalgia in Science Fiction Literature and Film

  • Robert Stromberg

    Robert Stromberg is a two time Academy Award winner for art direction for James Cameron’s Avatar and Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland. Stromberg’s credits include The Hunger Games, HBO’s Boardwalk Empire and The Pacific, Shutter Island, Tropic Thunder, The Golden Compass, and Pan’s Labyrinth. He will make his directorial debut with the 2014 film Maleficent.

    Session 62: IATSE Local 800 – the Art Directors Guild - Presents

  • Alfredo Suppia

    Alfredo Suppia is adjunct professor of Film Studies at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Brazil, member of the Brazilian Society for Film And Audiovisual Studies (SOCINE) and the Science Fiction Research Association (SFRA).

    Session 59: Labor and Capital in Science Fiction

  • Craig Svonkin

    Craig Svonkin is Assistant Professor of English at Metropolitan State College of Denver; he specializes in American literature, Children's literature, American poetry, and American film and visual culture. Since 2009, Dr. Svonkin has also served as Executive Director of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association. His publications include Manishevitz and Sake, the Kaddish and Sutras: Allen Ginsberg's Spiritual Self-Othering (forthcoming in College Literature), A Southern California Boyhood in the Simu-Southland Shadows of Walt Disney's Enchanted Tiki Room (forthcoming in Kathy Merlock Jackson and Mark West's Disneyland and Its Global Impact, from McFarland & Company Publishers), and Muggles and Giants and House-elves, Oh My: Harry Potter, Liberalism, and the Problem of Evil (forthcoming in Research Digest: A Quarterly Journal of Higher Education). 

    Session 16: Mirror, Mirror: Intertextual Narratives of Power and Identity in Science Fiction Television

  • Amanda Thibodeau

    Amanda Thibodeau graduated in 2011 with her Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Miami, where she is currently a full time Lecturer teaching American Literature, World Literature, and Science Fiction. An article taken from her dissertation, Gender, Utopia, and Temporality in Feminist Science Fiction, was recently published in Science Fiction Studies. Her research interests include 20 and 21st Century American literature, gender and queer theory, science fiction, and literary responses to 9/11.

    Session 32: Queering the Genre

  • Derek J. Thiess

    Derek J. Thiess has been a member of SFRA since 2008 and specialize in American and international genre fiction, science studies, and science and religion. He recently completed his first book on alternate histories and anti-realist philosophy. Derek also taught science studies or science fiction at several universities, from UNC Chapel Hill (where he did his doctoral work), to Case Western Reserve, the University of Illinois, and UC Davis, where he is teaching now.

    Session 19: Science and Science Fiction

  • James H. Thrall

    James H. Thrall teaches religious studies at Knox College in Illinois, where he is the Knight Distinguished Assistant Professor for the Study of Religion and Culture, and chair of the religious studies program. He earned his doctorate in Religion and Culture at Duke University. He studies religion primarily as a social phenomenon, especially as communicated through cultural products of literature, film, and other media, with a particular emphasis on science fiction of all those types. Most recently he has been studying representations of religion in postcolonial science fiction. He regularly teaches a course in "Religion and Science Fiction."

    Session 15: Gods and Monsters in Science Fiction Television

  • Julie Ha Tran

    Julie Ha Tran is a doctoral candidate in the English department with a specialization in twentieth and twenty-first century American literature at the University of California, Davis. She is interested in postmodernism, science fiction, posthumanism, ecocriticism, and urban studies. More specifically, her work examines how science fiction cities rewrite and reinvigorate the classic trope of the body politic.

    Session 42: Ecological Themes in Science Fiction and Anime

  • Andrew Wenaus

    Andrew Wenaus is a Ph.D. candidate at The University of Western Ontario where he is working on the intersections between British and Irish Modernist literature, phenomenology, and the cognitive sciences. He is recently published in Science Fiction Studies 113, Electronic Book Review, Extrapolation 53.1, and Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts 23.2.

    Session 39: Mobility and Temporality

  • Nathaniel Williams

    Nathaniel Williams recently completed a Horatio Alger Fellowship in American Popular Culture at Northern Illinois University's Rare Books and Special Collections Library. He won Honorable Mention for the Norman Foerster Prize for his article on Frank Reade, Jr. dime novels in the June 2011 special Speculative Fiction issue of American Literature. His latest essay, Reconstructing Biblical History: Garrett Serviss, Pauline Hopkins, and Technocratic Exploration Novels, appears in Nineteenth-Century Contexts and was first presented at the 2009 Eaton SF Conference. He has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Kansas, where he serves on the advisory board of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction. From 2007 to 2009, he was Program Coordinator for AboutSF, a joint educational outreach project sponsored by SFRA, SFWA, and KU. He is currently a lecturer in the Department of English at University of California, Davis.

    Session 63: Musical Influences in Science Fiction
    Session 67: Celebrating James Gunn: Writer, Scholar, Teacher

  • Jerome Winter

    Jerome Winter, the Associate Editor of the Los Angeles Review of Book's SF page, is a Ph.D. student studying science fiction and contemporary American literature at the University of California, Riverside. His essay Epistemic Polyverses and the Subaltern: the Postcolonial World-System in Ian McDonald's Evolution's Shore and River of Gods appeared in the November 2012 issue of Science Fiction Studies. He is currently working on a dissertation on science fiction and globalization.

    Session 35: Techno-Aesthetics

  • David Wittenberg

    David Wittenberg teaches in the departments of English and Cinema & Comparative Literature at the University of Iowa.  He is the author of Philosophy, Revision, Critique: Rereading Practices in Heidegger, Nietzsche, and Emerson (Stanford 2001) and Time Travel: The Popular Philosophy of Narrative (Fordham 2012).  Currently, he is working on a new book project entitled Big Culture: Toward an Aesthetics of Magnitude.

    Session 33: Time Travel in Literature, Film, and Theory

     

  • Robert Wood

    Robert Wood is a student in comparative literature, currently working on his dissertation. His work examines the intersection between aesthetic and radical political movements. His dissertation argues that feminist science fiction allows for a unique examination of the role of social reproduction in the 20th century domestic sphere. Outside of this explicitly academic work, Robert has been active in the statewide efforts to defend public education, and has participated in efforts to reform the local graduate student union, UAW 2865. He is hoping to finish his dissertation by the end of the current year.

    Session 7: Gender Roles and Masquerade

  • Lisa Yaszek

    Lisa Yaszek is Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the School of Literature, Media and Communication at Georgia Tech. Her research interests include science fiction, cultural history, critical gender and race studies, and science and technology studies. Her essays on science fiction as a global language crossing centuries, cultures and continents appear in journals including Extrapolation, NWSA Journal, and Rethinking History. Her books include Galactic Suburbia: Recovering Women's Science Fiction (Ohio State University Press 2008) and the edited anthology Practicing Science Fiction: Critical Essays on Writing, Reading and Teaching the Genre (McFarland 2010).

    Session 9: Men, Women, and 2312
    Session 27: Parabolas and Beyond (Hyperbolas?)

  • Mark Young

    Mark Young is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of California, Riverside, where he studies twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature, science fiction, musicality, and visual culture. His forthcoming dissertation considers the intersections of contemporary literature, cultural studies, and musical media storage and playback technologies.

    Session 41: Approaches to Science Fiction(al) Music

  • Allen Zhang

    Allen Zhang is an English PhD student at the University of California, Los Angeles. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 2010, where he majored in English. Allen's current research interests are in new media and biopolitics.

    Session 40: Neoliberalism in SF Media

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Department Information

UC Riverside Special Collections Rivera Library, Fourth Floor
322 Tomas Rivera Library

Tel: (951) 827-3233
E-mail: specialcollections@ucr.edu

Related Links

Footer